Student Health Clinic

Health alert regarding COVID-19 (coronavirus):

The Student Health Clinic is moving to telehealth appointments only beginning Monday, March 23. The clinic will no longer provide face-to-face office visits, but will support students via telephone and Zoom telehealth visits. Students must call 319-273-2009 opt#1 to be assessed over the phone. Clinic staff will remain available 8-4:30 Monday through Friday.  

The Counseling Center will also provide mental health services via telehealth (through Zoom). Please call 319-273-2676 to schedule an appointment.

We are following guidance from state and local public health officials (and the CDC) regarding this outbreak.  Student Health is in direct communication with the health officials who are closely monitoring the situation in our community and state, and will implement any recommendations they might have for management of the outbreak.  For more information on this emerging health issue, see information from the Iowa Department of Public Health and the CDC.  

If you have traveled to/from an affected area in the last 14 days and feel sick with fever, cough or difficulty breathing, you should seek medical care right away. Before you go to a healthcare office, call ahead and tell them about your travel and your symptoms.

Students with any health-related concerns or questions, please contact the Student Health Clinic at (319)-273-2009 opt.#1. After hours care options are available on our website.

The most up-to-date information on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from the university can be found at prepare.uni.edu.

 

 

Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders Support Team

The University of Northern Iowa University Health Services has an Eating Disorders Support Team. Students with eating disorders may receive assistance through self-referral, by referral from a friend or parent, or by referral from another campus professional. Students who participate receive coordinated care that includes medical evaluation, psychological evaluation, nutritional and lifestyle counseling and women's clinic services.

To talk to one of the health professionals at University Health Services you can call the Student Health Clinic (319) 273-2009, Counseling Center (319) 273-2676, or Health Education counseling (319) 273-2137.

What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are not necessarily about food, but food is the tool that people with eating disorders abuse. Eating disorders have both physical and psychological symptoms. They are characterized by abnormal attitudes and feelings about food, weight and body shape, an extreme disruption in eating behaviors and weight management, and intense anxiety about body weight and size.

Eating Disorders usually refer to three different entities: Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder.

  • Anorexia Nervosa is characterized by restricted eating, self-starvation and excessive weight loss. There is a refusal to maintain weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height. An intense fear of gaining weight and an unrealistic fear of becoming fat also exist. Body image is distorted. An unhealthy concern with body weight, shape, and even a particular body area may persist (like "oh, my thighs are so huge").
  • Bulimia Nervosa is characterized by recurrent episodes of overeating large amounts of food in a short period of time (the binge) followed by some form of purging, including self-induced vomiting, laxative or diuretic abuse, fasting, diet pills, or excessive exercise, intended to prevent weight gain. The attempt to prevent weight gain is often unsuccessful.
  • Binge Eating Disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating that are not followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors (purging) to prevent weight gain. It often presents with a sense of lack of control over eating during the binge, overeating large amounts of food in a short time period of time, and eating alone because of being embarrassed by the amount one is eating.

Do I have a problem?

There are many levels of eating disorders. Some general questions which may point to a need for further evaluation include:

  • Do I weigh myself daily?
  • Do I skip at least one meal a day?
  • Do I count calories and fat grams?
  • Am I currently or frequently on a diet?
  • Have I lost weight? How much?
  • Do I experience binge eating?
  • Do I purge (vomit, use laxatives or diuretics) after meals?
  • Do I exercise excessively?
  • Do I exercise because I want to or because I feel I have to?

Do you answer yes often? If so you might want to consider talking to one of the health professionals at University Health Services or your own provider to learn more.

Accreditation

The Student Health Clinic is an AAAHC accredited facility. We participate in a voluntary site survey to measure the quality of our services and performance against nationally recognized standards of The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care.

Accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, INC